BOOKS / 出版物

Reflections on Tsuda Umeko

Reflections on Tsuda Umeko

Pioneer of Women's Education in Japan

Ōba Minako
Translated by Tani Yū

Future Titles / Culture

To be published by JPIC | ISBN 978-4-86658-181-1 (Hardcover) | 264 pages | 210mm (h) x 148mm (w) | March 2021

※Information for this title is still tentative and subject to change prior to publication

About the Book

Japan’s five-thousand yen banknote will have a new face as of 2024, and that face is Tsuda Umeko (18641929), who devoted her life to the education of Japanese women. Umeko founded one of Japan’s first schools of higher education for women—a school that later became Tsuda College. Half a century after her death, an old trunk in the college attic was found to contain hundreds of personal letters written by Umeko to her foster mother in America, Adeline Lanman.

Umeko had been sent to America as a young child to learn English and the ways of Western civilization. She returned to Japan at eighteen, completely Americanized and a stranger in her own country. The “attic letters” are a fascinating chronicle of her repatriation to late-19th century Japan, and of her encounters with iconic figures such as Japan’s first prime minister Itō Hirobumi.

This book shows how the passionate young girl metamorphosed into one of Japan’s foremost educators, by following the thoughts of Umeko herself as she recorded them in her letters. The story is told by Ōba Minako, a writer who graduated from Tsuda College and was herself a returnee to Japan after a decade in the United States.

Tsuda Umeko was awarded the 42nd Yomiuri Prize for Literature (1990).

About the Author

ŌBA Minako

Ōba Minako was born in Tokyo on November 11, 1930. She graduated from Tsuda College in 1953 with a degree in English literature, then married and moved to the United States in 1959 when her husband took a position as a chemical engineer in Sitka, Alaska. She and her family lived there until 1970.

In 1968, her debut novel, Sanbiki no kani (Three Crabs) won the Akutagawa Prize, a prestigious literary prize awarded to new authors, thus opening her way to a writing career. Apart from several dozen novels, she wrote essays, literary criticism, poetry, and a play, and co-edited a number of literary anthologies. She also translated children’s books from English into Japanese and Japanese classics into modern Japanese.

Ōba was awarded numerous prizes, including the Women Writers’ Prize for Garakuta hakubutsukan (The Museum of Odds and Ends) in 1975, the Tanizaki Prize for Katachi mo naku (Without Form) in 1982, the Noma Prize for Naku tori no (Of Birds Crying) in 1986, the Yomiuri Prize for Tsuda Umeko in 1990, and the Murasaki Shikibu Literary Prize for Urayasu uta nikki (Urayasu Poem Diary) in 2003. She played an active role in the Japanese literary world and served as the first female member of the Akutagawa Prize selection committee, vice president of the Japan P.E.N. Club, and head of the Women Writers’ Association. She was elected to the Japan Art Academy in 1991.

A number of her novels and short stories have been translated into Western languages, including the novels Three Crabs, Of Birds Crying, and Urashimaso in English; Träume fischen and Tanze, Schneck, Tanz in German; and L’île sans enfants and Larmes de princesse in French.

Ōba Minako died on May 24, 2007. She was 76 years old.

内容紹介

新五千円札「津田梅子」の傑作評伝

日本の女子教育の近代化に生涯を捧げ、新五千円札の肖像画にも選定された津田梅子。ある日、梅子が創設した津田塾大学(女子英学塾)の倉庫から、おびただしい数の手紙が発見される。それは梅子と、留学先の里親アデリン・ランマンとの往復書簡の束であった。

完全にアメリカナイズされた梅子と日本文化とのギャップ、開明的な政治家・伊藤博文一家との交流、女子教育にかける熱意などが生々しく記された手紙の真意を、同じく津田塾大学出身の著者が自らの渡米経験も踏まえて読み解いていく。

第42回読売文学賞(評論・伝記賞)を受賞した傑作評伝。

著者紹介

大庭みな子

1930年東京生まれ。津田塾大学卒。夫の海外勤務のため11年間アラスカに住む。68年『三匹の蟹』で群像新人文学賞、芥川賞受賞。2007年5月、逝去。著書に、『がらくた博物館』(女流文学賞)『寂兮寥兮(かたちもなく)』(谷崎潤一郎賞)『啼く鳥の』(野間文芸賞)など。

Original Japanese Edition / 原書情報

津田梅子

津田梅子

大庭みな子 著

小学館 刊

2019/10/10

https://sgk.me/2xcClXE